Connecting to the Net




 
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  Internet Connections - Macintosh OSX 

Links:  Create a connection | Edit a connection |

Related Links:  How to Get Connected | How to find your IP Address |

Links on this page:  Pinging via the Network Utility applet | Pinging via the Terminal applet | Running a Traceroute |

 

Pinging on Mac OS X &  Mac OS X Jaguar

A Ping helps diagnose problems with DNS configuration and IP addresses.  If you have a "connect-but-can't-browse" problem, you can diagnose the cause of it by pinging a name address or an IP address.  You can also run a traceroute to see where the network is down.

There are two programs you can use to ping a name address or an IP address with Mac OSX:  Terminal and Network Utility.  To access these two utilities, do the following:

On the Toolbar, click Go and select Utilities folder from the menu.

Double click the Network Utility icon.

 

Pinging via the Network Utility applet:

Select the Ping tab.

There are two ways to ping an Internet site:
   
1.  By name address i.e., www.yahoo.com, www.ebay.com, etc.
   
2.  By IP address i.e., 66.218.71.80, etc.

Please enter the network address to Ping  =  Enter an Internet address.  In this example, we used www.yahoo.com.

When pinging a name address you are testing the DNS configuration.  As you can see,  there is a response.  The IP address of yahoo.com was returned.  If this were not so, the server would have timed out.  From this response we know two things:
    1.  The site is there and working (in this case yahoo.com).
    2.  The DNS addresses are configured properly on your computer.

If there is no response, check the DNS configuration and ensure that the addresses are set to have nothing in there at all or to have these two addresses:  209.210.176.8 and 209.210.176.9.

 

Pinging an IP Address:

When pinging an IP address you are testing the integrity of TCP/IP.  In this example, we typed in the IP address of yahoo.com (response from the example above).  As you can see,  there is a response.  We now know two things:
    1.  The site is there and working (66.218.71.80).
    2.  TCP/IP on your computer is functioning properly.

If there is no response, TCP/IP has been corrupted.

Important:  If both the DNS and the TCP/IP are functioning properly, you'll need to check your browsers proxy settings or you may need to upgrade your browser or possibly reinstall the browser.  Try rebooting your machine to see if that helps.

 

Pinging via the Terminal applet:

You can also Ping from the Terminal applet.

On the Toolbar, click Go and select Utilities folder from the menu.

Double click the Terminal icon.

 

To ping a name address from the Terminal window, do the following:

[Computer:~] user%  =  Enter ping www.address.com (address = the address in question) and click the Enter key.

Important:  There needs to be a space between ping and the name address.

You'll get the same outcome as you do with the Network Utility.

 

[Computer:~] user%  =  Enter ping address (address = the IP address in question) and click the Enter key.

Important:  There needs to be a space between ping and the IP address.

You'll get the same outcome as you do with the Network Utility.

 

Running a Traceroute from the Network Utility:

Another way of identifying problems with browsing is by running a traceroute.

Let me give an example.  Suppose you live in a suburb of Los Angeles and you need to drive to LAX.  As you drive along, you discover that you can't get to the airport because along the freeway there is a traffic jam or part of the freeway is under construction.  The same is true with the Internet.  When you type in a Web address, there may be a host that is down along the way, not functioning, or jammed with Internet traffic that prevents you from getting to that address.  You can know which host is down by running a traceroute.

Tracerouting is a network debugging utility that traces the path from source to destination.  This means that if you're running a traceroute from your ISP to Yahoo!, you will see not only the source (you) and the destination (Yahoo!), if it's working, but also all the intermediary hosts along the way.  If one host is down along the path, the trace route will tell you.  Do the following:

On the Toolbar, click Go and select Utilities folder from the menu.

Double click the Network Utility icon.

Note:  You can also run a trace route from the Terminal applet.

 

Select the Traceroute tab.

Please enter the network address to trace an internet route to  =  enter the name address or IP address you're trying to reach e.g., www.yahoo.com or 66.218.71.80. 

The traceroute will trace the path from source (you) to destination (the address you're trying to reach).  Each number represents a host and one hop.  The fewer hops there are, the quicker you should access the site.  The more hops there are, the greater the possibility your browser will time out before reaching the site.  If a host is down, or for some reason inaccessible, the trace route will tell you by timing out.

 

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